Founders of this Chantry, the interaction of ritual and memorial.

I had a trip into Berkshire a few months ago and to Childrey, where the church is a complex building of extraordinary interest, with lots of medieval glass and numerous late medieval monumental brasses. In the south transept, there is a fine early sixteenth-century monument of Purbeck marble which is built up against the north... Continue Reading →

‘callyd the bachellers lyte’

Goodness, what a building. The Church of Our Lady in Worstead in Norfolk is an enormous box of delights, built on the wealth of the cloth trade.  Worstead was a major centre of yarn manufacture and weaving from the twelfth century to such an extent that the general term for high-quality woollen cloth took its... Continue Reading →

Landscapes and townscapes

//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.jsHillesden church in north Buckinghamshire is an impressive church, a pure, Perpendicular glass house, a coherent whole, all built in a single campaign.//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.jsWe know that in 1493 the previous church was somewhat ruinous and that provides a terminus post quem for the structure, which appears to have been built in stages up to c.1510. For... Continue Reading →

The great and terrible day of the Lord – the Wenhaston Doom

//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.jsWenhaston is a small and rather ordinary village about three or four miles inland from Southwold on the Suffolk coast.   It's church is a fairly ordinary building, rather heavily restored in the 1892 and with the old parish constable's handcuffs and shackles hanging up in its vestry, as you do!//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js Had it not been for... Continue Reading →

The Image of Pity – the Wellingham rood screen.

Wellingham is a remote little hamlet in the middle of Norfolk to the south of Fakenham.  It's church, heavily rebuilt in 1896 is rather undistinguished, but it contains a great treasure.  The dado of a rood screen from the 1530s.   Rather interestingly the screen is inscribed and precisely dated. The inscription on the upper... Continue Reading →

Two fragments of painted stone reredoses

This is just the sort of thing that gets me excited, a bit of stone with a fragment of painted decoration on it that gives us just a tantalising glimpse of the liturgical arrangements that once existed in our parish churches before the Reformation. Here are photos of two fragments of the type of altarpiece... Continue Reading →

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